Because kratom produces effects similar to opioids, the plant has traditionally been used to relieve pain. Used in higher doses, however, it can lead to liver damage, seizures, insomnia, irregular heartbeat, and even death. Continue reading for more vital information on kratom’s risks, withdrawal symptoms, and how our experts can help you find the right detox program for you or a loved one. What Are Kratom’s Risks? Although kratom may have certain desirable effects, it can also cause a number of negative consequences. Some of the unwanted or dangerous short-term effects of kratom use include:6,7 Nausea and vomiting. Constipation. Sedation. Itching. Aggressive behavior. Irritability. Anxiety. Rapid heart rate. Seizures. Kratom can also be dangerous because it is unregulated, which means you can never be fully sure what you are taking. Some kratom samples have tested positive for other opioids, such as hydrocodone or tramadol. Kratom can also be dangerous when taken in combination with other legal and illegal drugs (such as alcohol, sedatives, opioids, stimulants, or cannabinoids), but little research exists to show exactly what those dangers are.6,9 Research is somewhat limited on long-term effects of kratom use. However, some of the potential long-term effects can include:6,8 Weight loss. Tremors (shakiness). Constipation. Dark spots (hyperpigmentation) on the cheeks. Liver damage. Psychosis (believing things that aren’t true without knowing those beliefs aren’t based in reality). Seizures. Sleep trouble (insomnia). Irregular heartbeat.   Kratom Addiction Potential Long-term kratom use can lead to dependence, which means that you need the drug to function and avoid unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Continued kratom use can also lead to addiction, which is a chronic, relapsing condition characterized by compulsive drug-seeking behavior. If you are addicted to a substance, you continue to use the drug despite the negative consequences. What Is Kratom Withdrawal? Kratom withdrawal happens when you are physically dependent on it and suddenly try to stop using or dramatically cut down your use. Many people find the withdrawal symptoms so uncomfortable that hey keep using kratom to prevent or ease these symptoms. One study found that half of regular kratom users developed severe dependence problems, while 45% showed a moderate dependence. The higher the dose used, the more likely the person was to develop a more severe dependence.5 Common kratom withdrawal symptoms include:5 Muscle spasms. Pain. Watery eyes. Runny nose. Hot flashes. Fever. Lower appetite. Diarrhea. Trouble sleeping. Restlessness. Nervousness. Tension. Anger. Sadness. Cravings. How Long Does It Take to Recover from Kratom Withdrawal? Going through the stages of kratom withdrawal can take some time. Though we still don’t know a lot about kratom addiction and withdrawal, the withdrawal timeline is fairly similar to the withdrawal timeline for other opioids. In general, symptoms: May appear 6 to 12 hours after quitting. Peak in intensity 72 hours after last dose. Slowly get better after around 5 or 7 days. These stages are not fixed in time, and depend on factors such as: Your history of substance use. How much and how often you use. Personal medical history. Age. If you use other substances. [self-assessment] How Can I Deal with Kratom Withdrawal Symptoms? If you’re dealing with kratom addiction or withdrawal symptoms, you may find relief and help in addressing your substance use. The first step for many patients is detoxification, or detox for short. Professional medical detox programs help care for acute symptoms of withdrawal, as well as sketch out a course for further recovery efforts. There are two main detox settings: Inpatient, where you live at a treatment center full-time. Staff is onsite 24/7 to check your progress and keep you safe. Outpatient, where you live at home and go to set appointment times, so you can still work and take care of family if needed. It's important to note detox programs also differ in other respects, from location and pricing to visiting hours policy and level of care offered. If you or a loved one needs help understanding treatment options, call the American Addiction Centers (AAC) 24/7 opioid detox hotline at [phone]. AAC have treatment centers throughout the country to help you with any withdrawal and addiction needs. Alternatively, if you would like to get started online, start the process by checking your insurance coverage instantly or texting our team. [vob-aktify-cta] [accordion title="Detox at American Addiction Centers (AAC)"] Detox Centers: Laguna Treatment Hospital Adcare - Rhode Island Adcare - Boston Sunrise House Desert Hope Greenhouse Oxford Treatment Center Recovery First River Oaks Immediate Service Areas: Aliso Viejo, CA Kingstown, RI Worcester, MA Lafayette, NJ Las Vegas, NV Grand Prairie, TX Etta, MS Hollywood, FL Riverview, FL [/accordion][accordion title="Detox centers by state"] Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming [/accordion][accordion title ="Detox insurance coverage"] Aetna Ambetter Blue Cross Blue Shield Bright Health Humana Kaiser Permanente Medicaid Medicare Tricare Without Insurance Veterans Insurance [/accordion][accordion title ="Treatment articles"] Detox services: Inpatient detox Outpatient detox Medical detox Rehab services: Rehab Inpatient rehab Outpatient rehab Same-day rehab State-funded rehab 30-60-90 day rehab Free rehab Choosing rehab Co-occurring Disorders Anxiety Depression PTSD Therapy Aftercare services: Aftercare Sober Living Support Groups Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) Narcotics Anonymous (NA) [/accordion] [sources] National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2018). Kratom. U.S. Food & Drug Administration. (2018). Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., on the agency’s scientific evidence on the presence of opioid compounds in kratom, underscoring its potential for abuse. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. (2018). In the News: Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa). Post S., Spiller H., Chounthirath T., & Smith G. (2019). Kratom exposures reported to United States poison control centers: 2011–2017, Clinical Toxicology, DOI: 10.1080/15563650.2019.1569236 Singh D., Müller C., Vicknasingam B. (2014). Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) dependence, withdrawal symptoms and craving in regular users, Drug and Alcohol Dependency, DOI: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.03.017 Prozialeck, W., Jivan, J. & Andurkar, S. (2012). Pharmacology of kratom: An emerging botanical agent with stimulant, analgesic and opioid-like effects. Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, 112 (12), 792-799. Drug Enforcement Administration. (2017). Drugs of abuse: Kratom. Springfield, VA: Drug Enforcement Administration & U.S. Department of Justice. European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction. (2015). Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) drug profile. Consumer Reports. (2018). The dangers of taking kratom. [/sources] ...